Thomas Sequist
Thomas Sequist, MD, MPH
Chief Patient Experience and Equity Officer, Mass General Brigham; Professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, with joint appointments in the Division of General Medicine at Brigham & Women’s Hospital & Department of Health Care
Harvard Medical SchoolDepartment of Health Care Policy180 Longwood AvenueBoston, MA 02115-5899

Dr. Sequist is the Chief Patient Experience and Equity Officer at Mass General Brigham.  In this role he leads system wide strategies for improving patient experience and health care equity, while also overseeing quality and safety.  He is a practicing general internist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and is a Professor of Medicine and Professor of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School.  Previous to his current role, Dr. Sequist served as the Chief Quality and Safety Officer at Partners Healthcare, and also as the Director of Research and Clinical Program Evaluation for Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates and Atrius Health.  Dr. Sequist’s research interests include ambulatory quality measurement and improvement, with a focus on patient and provider education, and the innovative use of health information technology.  Dr. Sequist is particularly interested in health policy issues affecting care for Native Americans, and has worked collaboratively with the Indian Health Service to evaluate the provision of care for this population. 

Dr. Sequist is a member of the Taos Pueblo tribe in New Mexico and is committed to improving Native American health care, serving as the Director of the Four Directions Summer Research Program at Harvard Medical School and the Medical Director of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Physician Outreach Program with the Indian Health Service.  He graduated from Cornell University with a B.S. in chemical engineering.  He received his M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School, and his M.P.H. degree from the Harvard School of Public Health.

For Selected Services, Blacks and Hispanics More Likely to Receive Low-Value Care Than Whites
Authors: Schpero WL, Morden NE, Sequist TD, Rosenthal MB, Gottlieb DJ, Colla CH
Health Affairs
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The Effect of Price Information on the Ordering of Images and Procedures
Authors: Chien AT, Ganeshan S, Schuster MA, Lehmann LS, Hatfield LA et al
Pediatrics
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A Randomized Trial of Displaying Paid Price Information on Imaging Study and Procedure Ordering Rates
Authors: Chien AT, Lehmann LS, Hatfield LA, Koplan KE, Petty CR et al
Journal of General Internal Medicine
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Clinicians’ Views of an Intervention to Reduce Racial Disparities in Diabetes Outcomes
Authors: Thorlby R, Jorgensen S, Ayanian JZ,
Journal of the National Medical Association
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Cost-effectiveness of patient mailings to promote colorectal cancer screening
Authors: Sequist TD, Franz C and Ayanian JZ
Medical Care
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Cultural competency training and performance reports to improve diabetes care for black patients: a cluster randomized, controlled trial.
Authors: Sequist TD, Fitzmaurice GM, Marshall R, et al.
Annals of Internal Medicine
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Indigenous people in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States are less likely to receive renal transplantation.
Authors: Yeates KE, Cass A, Sequist TD, et al.
Kidney International
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Patient and physician reminders to promote colorectal cancer screening: A randomized controlled trial.
Authors: Sequist TD, Zaslavsky AM, Marshall R, et al.
Archives of Internal Medicine
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Physician performance and racial disparities in diabetes mellitus care.
Authors: Sequist TD, Fitzmaurice GM, Marshall R, et al.
Archives of Internal Medicine
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Physician reminders to promote surveillance colonoscopy for colorectal adenomas: a randomized controlled trial.
Authors: Ayanian JZ, Sequist TD, Zaslavsky AM, et al.
Journal of General Internal Medicine
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